Can Good Weed Have Seeds

What can you do with marijuana seeds you find at the bottom of the bag? Wonder no more. Here's what to do with weed seeds. I love seedless weed. It’s just so easy. But now, instead of grumbling on the rare occasions when I find a marijuana seed, I get excited. If you're looking to start growing your own marijuana, the first place to start is with the seed. What should you look for? How can you tell a good cannabis seed from a dud? Chris Bond tells us.

What To Do With Your Spare Weed Seeds

If you find seeds in your cannabis and were wondering what to do with them, you should know that you have quite a few options.

Ever find seeds in your cannabis and find yourself wondering what to do with weed seeds? When you buy a bag of weed from a competent grower, you should be getting sinsemilla, which is seedless clusters of cannabis flowers from female plants that have been protected from being pollinated. When female plants are not pollinated, they continue to grow more and more flowers, sticky with resin and potent in cannabinoids.

But if female plants are pollinated because there are male or hermaphrodite plants growing nearby, the flowers will contain seeds. You’ll want to separate the seeds from the herb before you smoke. The burning seeds have an unpleasant acrid taste, and won’t get you high anyway. So what can you do with marijuana seeds?

What Can You Do With Marijuana Seeds?

What to do with weed seeds depends somewhat on how many you have. If you only have a few seeds, you might consider planting them and trying your hand at growing pot. Cannabis cultivation can be a fun and rewarding hobby. Many a master grower got their start by wondering what to do with weed seeds they had laying around.

If you have a lot of heavily seeded pot or have been collecting cannabis seeds for a while, you might have a source of food for yourself, or perhaps even your furry or feathered friends. And if smoking pot gets your creative juices flowing, another answer to what to do with weed seeds is use them as a fun new artistic medium.

Weed Seeds Uses #1: New Plants

What can you do with marijuana seeds? Plant them, of course! All flora that produce seeds do so in order to create the next generation of plants, and cannabis is no exception. If you give your seeds the right environmental conditions including moisture and temperature, they will germinate, or sprout, and begin to grow. Nurturing young plants with the proper light, water, and nutrients will allow them to grow to a size suitable for flowering.

When the nighttime period of darkness gets long enough, either through the change of seasons outdoors or by adjusting the on/off light cycle in a grow room, the plants you started from seed will begin to flower. If you observe your plants closely, you’ll be able to determine which are female and which are male. Unless you want to produce seed, remove all male plants as you identify them. A couple more months of diligent care, and you will be ready to harvest your own free weed! All because you wondered what to do with weed seeds left in the bottom of a baggie.

Weed Seeds Uses #2: A Tasty Snack

Some research suggests that humans have cultivated cannabis as a food source for millennia. Cannabis seeds are rich in healthy fats and have protein, all nine essential amino acids, potassium, iron, Vitamin A, and dietary fiber. The seeds also have zinc and magnesium and are naturally low in carbohydrates.

Whole pot seeds can be made into hemp milk by adding water and mixing well in a blender before straining. Whole seeds can also be eaten whole roasted or raw, but some find the shells unappetizing or difficult to digest.

Marijuana seeds can also be shelled and used as hemp hearts. To shell seeds, place as many as possible in one layer between two cutting boards. Tap the top board with a hammer just lightly enough to crack the shells without flattening the seeds. Place in a bucket of water and stir vigorously. The shells will float. Skim them off before straining and drying the hemp hearts.

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Sprinkle hemp seeds over yogurt, salads, or oatmeal to add a mild nutty crunch that is packed with healthy nutrients.

Weed Seeds Uses #3: Animal Food

What can you do with marijuana seeds if you’re an animal lover? Share them with your bird and rodent friends! The nutrition found in weed seeds is good for more than just humans, so add some to the feed for pet birds, hamsters, mice, and rats. Or add them to an outdoor bird feeder as a treat for wild feathered friends.

Weed Seeds Uses #4: Be an Artist!

A recent visit to Etsy, the online marketplace for hand-crafted goods and art, revealed jewelry made from pot seeds suspended in acrylic for earrings, necklaces, and more. Pot seeds are also an interesting subject for photographers, particularly those who create macro images.

Marijuana seeds naturally come in a range of colors including white, cream, and green when they are immature. Fully mature seeds can be found in shades of tan, brown, and nearly black. An abundance of the full palette of colors could be the perfect medium for a 420-friendly mosaic for a patient and talented artist.

Usually, you won’t want to find yourself with a bunch of pot seeds. But if you do have a steady supply and are inclined to collect them, you can put the seeds to use in a variety of ways. Have you thought of any more?

What To Do If You Find Seeds In Your Weed

When I lived in the Midwest, I would drive 70 miles each way to buy weed. I would buy whatever strain my dealer had. And I knew I’d end up with a lot of marijuana seeds.

Like most smokers, I wanted as much smokeable bud as possible, and seeds always felt like a net loss. I couldn’t smoke them. I couldn’t use them to grow my own plant (not in Indiana, anyway). So I threw them away.

After moving to Boulder, I almost forgot about seedy cannabis.

I would stop by Karing Kind dispensary every week or two, buying anywhere from an eighth to an ounce, and over the years I have found fewer than five seeds in my weed.

Pounds and pounds of clean-grown, top-shelf bud… five total seeds. That’s an incredible track record!

But as I’ve come to appreciate, finding seeds in your weed doesn’t have to be a bad thing. The occasional seed hardly affects how much flower you have to smoke, and with a little effort it has the potential to turn into your very own pot plant. Hooray! Free weed!

I still love seedless marijuana. It’s just so easy to grind and smoke. But now, instead of grumbling on those rare occasions when I find a seed, I get excited.

Seed Be Gone: Top-Shelf Cannabis Grown With the Best Available Methods

The plants grown in Karing Kind’s garden are carefully monitored and cared for. Male plants are removed prior to pollination, and female plants are nurtured to reduce stress, which limits the occurrence of self-pollinating hermaphroditic plants.

This all goes to ensure the bud you buy is as potent and dense as possible, with limited stems and almost no seeds. And that means more smokeable marijuana.

Of course, after more than a year without finding even a single seed in my cannabis, I began to rethink my resistance to seedy weed.

After all, Colorado residents are allowed to grow their own cannabis plants for personal use… shouldn’t I be actively hoping for seeds that I could try to turn into my own source of top-shelf marijuana?

Are Cannabis Seeds from Recreational Dispensary Bud Worth Growing?

Who wouldn’t want a chance at growing their own marijuana, especially when you know you’re getting a favorite strain and what potency and effects you can expect?

But seeds you find in store-bought weed are not the same as seeds that have been stabilized over time. In some cases, seeds won’t maintain the potency, yield or fragrance of the original plant. This potential change in quality is why many growers prefer to use clones.

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That doesn’t mean you should just throw out seeds you find!

It’s still a free cannabis seed with the potential to produce a high-yielding plant you couldn’t grow otherwise. No, it might not end up being an exact clone of the strain you found it in. But when you’re starting with top-shelf bud, even a slight shift in the next generation’s quality will yield potent, flavorful flower.

Try to get your seed to sprout, and give it time to flower before deciding whether to maintain that plant or move on to greener pastures.

What Do Viable Marijuana Seeds Look Like?

The only sure way to know if a seed is viable is to try to germinate and see if it sprouts.

Generally speaking, viable seeds are darker and relatively hard. Even if a seed is pale and easy to crush between your fingers, however, it’s worth trying to get a sprout before giving up on the seed as nonviable.

What’s the Difference Between Seeds You Find and Seeds You Buy?

When you buy seeds from a trusted breeder, like those sold at Karing Kind recreational marijuana dispensary in Boulder, you can expect they will carry the same properties of the “mother” plant. That’s because these seeds have been carefully stabilized over generations.

The seeds you find in store-bought marijuana flower aren’t even supposed to be there. That doesn’t mean there’s anything wrong with the seeds you find… there’s just a little more room for variations in the quality and yield of the plant the seed grows.

Even when buying seeds from trusted breeders, there isn’t any guarantee your plant will exactly mirror the mother plant. Your growing method, soil, temperature, lights and dozens of other factors can all impact the yield, smell and potency of the plant.

Learn more about how to set up your home grow , and let us know in the comments if you have turned any “unwanted” seeds into your very own cannabis plant.

To Seed or Not to Seed…

The only time I have a green thumb is after eating lime jello. I once managed to kill a cactus. If I’m going to try my hand at growing something again, it may as well be with free cannabis seeds.

Because of their attention to detail and careful growing methods, you aren’t likely to find seeds in the flower you buy at Karing Kind. Just pure, top-shelf marijuana. But i f you do find a seed, why not see how it grows? You could end up with your very own cannabis plant and a free, ongoing supply of top-shelf flower.

Or – if you want to ensure the most bud for your effort – you can buy stabilized seeds from Freeworld Genetics for pickup at Karing Kind in North Boulder.

While we carry a variety of strains, concentrates, edibles, salves and tinctures, inventory and stock levels fluctuate from week to week and month to month. Check our menu and follow us on Twitter for an up-to-date list of edibles, concentrates and buds available.

10 Markers of a Quality Marijuana Seed

If you’re looking to start growing your own marijuana, the first place to start is with the seed. What should you look for? How can you tell a good cannabis seed from a dud? Chris Bond tells us.

So, you’ve decided to grow your own marijuana from seed. How do you know if those little, round nuggets in your hand will grow up lush and produce beautiful, productive buds? How do you know if they are duds? While ultimately the genetics will determine the destiny of those little weed seeds, and proper care will help them to realize their full potential, there are some markers you can assess to see if what you have is quality seed, indeed.

What to Look for in a Cannabis Seed

#1 Color

While all cannabis seed is not identical in color, there are some consistencies. Healthy, viable seed will be light to dark brown in color. Seed that is light green or even whitish in color is underdeveloped and should be tossed out. Healthy seed will also have a burled or turtle shell-like pattern on its seed coat.

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#2 Sheen

A quality cannabis seed will have a waxy, protective coating. Seeds that appear dull are probably not as viable and should be avoided if given a choice.

#3 Shape

Quality cannabis seed will look like a plump teardrop. Flat or misshapen seeds will not likely produce quality plants.

#4 Texture

Quality seed will be firm. Cannabis seed should have a strong seed coat protecting the pre-emerged life inside. Any seed that is tender, pliable or squishy should not be planted; poor results will follow if attempted.

#5 Size

Size is relative, but if you are able to compare several seeds at once, the higher quality seeds are larger. When it comes to seeds, less is more. The fewer seeds that comprise any given amount, an ounce or a gram for example, is generally an indicator of higher quality seeds. The biggest seeds within a species generally have more energy stored within them and have a greater potential to mature into a productive plant. Note that indica strains tend to produce larger seeds than sativa strains so make sure the comparison is made among like seeds.

#6 Weight

Weight often goes hand-in-hand with size, but heavier seeds are generally of higher quality than lighter ones. The older a seed gets, the more potential loss of moisture and nutrients, reducing its overall weight. Damaged seed, which has been cracked can potentially lose those same necessary qualities.

#7 Float test

Quality seeds will sink in water. In glass or vessel, place room temperature water deep enough to full cover the volume of seeds to be tested. Place your seed or seeds in the water. After a couple of hours, anything still floating, should not be considered a quality seed. Soaking seeds will allow moisture to cross over the protective membrane and signal the seed that it is time to grow. As such this test should not be performed if the intent is to store the seeds after testing as it may render otherwise quality seed unviable if not meant to be immediately germinated afterwards.

#8 Storage

You may not have access to see or have verified information on the storage conditions of seeds, but if you can find this out, it is critical to maintaining quality seeds. While cannabis seeds can be viable for over 10 years in some instances, the best seed in terms of productivity is not more than 12 to 18 months old. It should have been stored in dark, cool and dry conditions to prevent mold or the onset of any fungal issues. Storing in a freezer can prolong seeds as well, essentially suspending time.

#9 Age at harvest

This is another aspect you, the buyer may not be privy to. Quality seed is harvest when fully mature. If seed was collected before the plant was able to load as much stored energy into it as possible, then that seed will be starting out life in a deficit. Color, as referenced above can be an indicator of whether or not a seed was harvested at the appropriate time.

#10 Cost

You get what you pay for and a cannabis seed is not exempt from this maxim. Quality seeds are not cheap (at least when compared to other agricultural seeds). This isn’t to say that inferior seeds can’t be overpriced, but if you find cannabis seeds proclaiming excellent genetics for sale at a price that seems too good to be true, caveat emptor.

This is not meant to be a definitive list, as new varieties of cannabis emerge on the scene all the time that may have “normal” traits that would otherwise be viewed as deficiencies in other strains. As always, do your homework, ask other growers who know and buy your seeds from a reputable source.