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Can you send cannabis seeds through mail

Mailing Weed: Is It Safe, Even In America?

We often get asked how safe it is to mail cannabis, particularly across state lines in the US or even abroad. Are inspectors looking out for cannabis in the mail? Is it legal? Are you likely to get caught? If so, what’s the penalty for mailing or receiving weed in the post?

The truth is that the United States Postal Service does keep an eye out for drugs trafficking. After all, sticking your drugs in the mail is pretty easy to do. And more of us do it than you would probably think.

Let’s take a closer look at the current state of play and what you should, if anything, be worried about. We advise you read this carefully before you seal up the envelope with cannabis in it and send it out through the post.

You’re about to be unpleasantly surprised.

The War on Drugs

We all have access to sites that sell drugs and we can reach out with a few clicks of a mouse button or a couple of taps on our mobile phones to get what we want. It’s easy to buy and sell practically anything nowadays, even if it is illegal.

The truth is that most of these individuals on the dark net use still the good, old-fashioned US Postal Service to get their product from A to B.

But marijuana is legal, isn’t it? There’s no problem here? Yes, in many states cannabis is allowed for both recreational and medicinal use.

Here’s the thing, though. It is still illegal under the federal Controlled Substances Act and that means you can’t mail it to anyone. We’ll let that sink in for a moment.

US Postal Service inspectors are currently fighting a huge battle against the importation of illegal drugs, so you have to give them some leeway. Many of these narcotics are pretty dangerous, after all. And they are only applying the letter of the law.

Whatever you feel about the legality or otherwise of cannabis, you just have to accept that mailing weed is not allowed under federal law. And that’s unlikely to change soon. You may think it’s a little absurd. Many people do. But that doesn’t escape from the fact that, if you get caught, you can spend some significant time behind bars.

Mailing Weed: What Are the Statistics?

Postal inspectors are federal agents, the real deal, on a par with the FBI and other law enforcement agencies. The latest stats show that thousands of people are arrested each year for some form of drug trafficking offense through the mail. It can be difficult to get exact figures from the USPS but in 2013, postal inspectors discovered about 9,000 parcels containing in total about 47,000 pounds of weed.

There were 2,622 arrests for mailing controlled substances but it’s not clear how many of these were actually mailing weed. The truth is, however, that marijuana is the most often intercepted drug in the US. You shouldn’t be surprised by this as it’s legal in many states. Many people are posting out their weed without even realizing they are breaking the law.

There is some evidence that the levels of cannabis seized have come down in recent years. That’s probably because more stores are opening in legal states which means people don’t have to post out anymore or at least they are posting less. It could also be because many companies know that it’s a federal crime to be mailing weed inside and outside the US. They certainly don’t want to get into trouble.

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No knows, however, how much marijuana actually gets through the postal system. The inspectors may well only be seeing the tip of the iceberg. There are millions of letters and parcels posted across the US every day. It’s fair to say that the large majority mailing weed are getting their deliveries through. But that doesn’t mean you will never get caught.

Why Do So Many Risk Mailing Weed?

With strict penalties in force and our intrepid US Postal Service inspectors looking out for drugs of all sorts, it’s a surprise that people still use this method of delivery.

One reason may be down to confusion. Many people think, just because cannabis is legal in their state, that it’s safe to start mailing weed anywhere in the country. They don’t realize it is a federal crime and that they could go to jail because they haven’t bothered to check the rules.

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The other issue might be that people think it is safer. They’re prepared to take the risk of getting caught to have a product they can rely on, rather than buying from some shady crook on a street corner where they could risk personal injury. That could particularly apply to those who use cannabis for medicinal purposes and aren’t used to the darker side of obtaining drugs.

Before cannabis was legalized in many states, most of our drugs were transported over the border from Mexico. It’s only since businesses have started making their homegrown product that the power and influence of the cartels have been diminished, at least for cannabis. There is growing opinion that mailing weed should be decriminalized if states are now making recreational and medicinal use legal – there doesn’t seem a point in prohibition in this sense.

It would also give Americans the chance to build a cannabis industry that provides more jobs and opportunities. But don’t hold your breath if you think it’s going to happen within the next couple f years. Drugs law is not high on the federal agenda, even if stats have their own way of doing things.

Other Postal Services and Mailing Weed

Of course, USPS isn’t the only postal service available. There are others.

So, are you better off trying anther company and will you be less likely to get caught? The big ones that come to mind are FedEx, DHL and UPS. Actually, you may be more at risk.

Currently the US Postal Service needs a warrant to open your mail under the 4th Amendment. Private companies stipulate in their rules and regulations that they reserve the right to open any package they deem as suspicious, and that includes ones which may contain drugs.

It’s even been to the Supreme Court for a ruling – you can’t expect your parcel to be private at all if you use one of these companies. FedEx was even taken to court at one point and charged with playing a roll in trafficking drugs because they weren’t being so vigilant. That would suggest private courier firms are likely to be checking your parcel if you are mailing weed as they are trying to avoid prosecution and perhaps a hefty fine in the US.

At the end of the day, therefore, the US Postal Service could well be the safer bet if you are planning on mailing weed anytime soon. That’s pretty cold comfort.

What If I Get Caught Mailing Weed?

The big question, of course, is what happens if you do get caught mailing weed? While the US Postal Service may only be intercepting a fraction of the drugs passed through the mail, they do have some success. Budget cuts and a loss of employees haven’t helped, neither has the fact that their detection mechanisms remain relatively unsophisticated. That works in your favor but it’s not a chanceless pursuit.

If you are caught mailing weed, the chances are you will be looking at a prison sentence. It’s still classed as a Schedule 1 drug and any amount under 50 grams could see you getting five years in the nearest penitentiary. That’s irrespective of whether the cannabis was for your own use or you were just doing a favor for a friend. As you might expect, for larger amounts you could be facing much more jail time.

There is the story of a Texan who went to Colorado and bought about $50,000 of cannabis. Mailing the weed to his home address seemed a good idea but along the way someone at USPS decided his packages looked suspicious. When he went to his local postal depot to pick up the delivery, the cops were waiting for him. He now faces the possibility of between 8 and 24 years in prison.

Mailing Cannabis Seeds

While mailing weed is illegal in the US and in many other countries, mailing cannabis seeds is not. That may sound slightly counterintuitive but seeds are not actually a drug – they can just be grown into one. For example, it’s legal to buy cannabis seeds over the counter or have them posted to you in the UK but it is illegal to germinate those seeds and grow a cannabis plant.

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It’s always important to check the law where you live and whether it is legal to receive cannabis seeds, irrespective of whether you grow them or not. We do not advise mailing weed in the US or anywhere else – the risk is just not worth it.

We offer discreet packaging & delivery insurance options when you order cannabis seeds on our online store.

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Cultivation information, and media is given for those of our clients who live in countries where cannabis cultivation is decriminalised or legal, or to those that operate within a licensed model. We encourage all readers to be aware of their local laws and to ensure they do not break them.

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Not only do we have one of the most comprehensive libraries of cannabis seeds in the world, we now offer a diverse range of cannabis related goods for you to enjoy including storage products, clothing and books.

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Weed seeds may be legal to ship across the US, DEA says

Cannabis commercial and home growers alike may be able to get their seeds from all over the country now, and not have to worry about breaking federal law. Before, because of federal illegality, cannabis seeds have been restricted to the state in which they were produced, so a strain bred and grown in one state, legally, could not go beyond that state’s boundaries.

A recent legal clarification by the federal Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) could mean that the seeds of cannabis strains popular in one part of the country could legally be shipped to another part of the country, because the DEA considers all forms of cannabis seeds to be federally legal hemp.

That means strains popular in mature markets like Washington, Oregon, and California could make their way to legal markets on the East Coast in Massachusetts and Maine, and soon-to-open markets like New Jersey and New York.

Marijuana Moment reporter Kyle Jaeger recently unearthed a letter from DEA officials that clarifies the definition of cannabis seeds, clones, and tissue cultures, which could open up a whole range of possibilities for cannabis growers, and could spread a diversity of strains across legal markets all over the country, opening up the gene pool and leading to new trends and tastes in weed.

Are weed seeds illegal?

Right now, cannabis strains are somewhat isolated in the regions they are bred and created, as they can’t be transported beyond state lines. For example, even though recreational weed is legal at the state level in both California and Oregon, moving a plant from one of those states to the other is illegal at the federal level. This forces cannabis growers and breeders to operate within the confines of a specific state.

That’s not to say that a strain bred in California won’t end up in Oregon—it happens all the time, but it is technically illegal, according to federal law.

Many cannabis breeders and seed banks sell seeds throughout the US, but they operate in a legal gray area. Typically, seed producers say their seeds are sold for “novelty” or “souvenir” purposes, giving them a loophole to skirt the law.

If cannabis seeds are found in the mail, they could be seized and the sender or receiver arrested, however, the fact of the matter is that seeds are very difficult to detect. Cannabis seeds are usually less than a ¼” in diameter and don’t smell like weed. A packet of 10 seeds is about the size of four quarters stacked.

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But all that might have changed in 2018 without anyone knowing.

Defining ‘source’ vs. ‘material’

In 2018, Congress passed a farm bill that legalized hemp in the US. It defined “hemp” as any cannabis plant with less than 0.3% THC. This allows hemp to be grown and used for industrial purposes—for creating textiles and materials. The 2018 bill also opened up hemp production for the creation of cannabinoids other than delta-9 THC, such as CBD, delta-8, and others.

Because CBD and delta-8 products are usually extracted from hemp plants, that is, cannabis plants containing less than 0.3% THC, they can be found in states that don’t have legal, recreational cannabis.

In November, Shane Pennington, counsel at Vicente Sederberg LLP in New York, wrote to DEA officials asking for clarification of the definition of a cannabis seed, clone, and tissue culture.

Cannabis seeds have always been deemed illegal because they come from plants that are high in THC. The source of the seeds is above 0.3% THC, and therefore anything that comes from those plants, such as seeds, has also been considered illegal cannabis.

Pennington argued that the source of the material doesn’t determine legality, but the material itself—meaning that because a cannabis seed itself contains less than 0.3% THC, it should be classified as hemp. If seeds are hemp, they are not a controlled substance—and are therefore federally legal.

“When it comes to determining whether a particular cannabis-related substance is federally legal ‘hemp’ or schedule I “marihuana,” it is the substance itself that matters—not its source,” Pennington wrote in a blog post.

Exotic Genetix Mike, founder of cannabis producer Exotic Genetix, said the DEA’s ruling “Is what we’ve always kind of practiced. [Seeds contain] less than 0.3% THC—they’re not a controlled substance.”

Mike welcomed the news: “It’s been clarified. Not just what we do is legal, but the money we make for doing it is also legal and not an illegal enterprise.”

What implications does this have for the weed industry?

If the DEA and federal government allow seeds to cross state lines, adults could grow and consume seeds and strains from all over the country in their own state. Certain strains would no longer be confined to a specific region, but could be enjoyed all across the nation.

“It’ll spark innovation, if people can bring it above ground, it can be regulated,” said Pennington in an interview with Leafly.

Regulation can bring more investment, a bigger industry, and more acceptance of the plant.

Breaking down transportation barriers across states would also open up the cannabis gene pool, giving breeders a bigger diversity of strains to work with. The number and diversity of new strains would likely increase, tapping into new consumer trends and flavors.

More strains also means that certain strains could be pinpointed and bred specifically for certain effects, whether for medical or recreational purposes.

But according to Pennington, perhaps the biggest implication is that “This sends a signal, clearly, to state legislators, state regulators, and to groups that lobby those folks… the federal law is more flexible than you assumed.”

States take their cue from the DEA when creating their own drug laws, so seeing the agency relax its stance on shipping cannabis genetics could cause states to follow suit, breaking down protectionist state laws.

This could also open up more accurate research on the plant, according to Pennington. For decades, cannabis research was limited to The University of Mississippi, which grew weed with a low potency, around 8% THC. However, most dispensaries sell cannabis with a THC percentage around 20%. Being able to ship genetics across the country would allow for more robust research into the plant, using strains that mirror what adults are actually buying in stores and consuming.

How binding is the DEA letter?

The DEA calls the letter an “official determination,” but whether or not they are legally bound to this position is a bit hazy.

“That to me sure seems like something the agency would either be bound to going forward or at least be very hesitant to deviate from in any kind of enforcement context,” said Pennington.

For now, the DEA’s acknowledgment that cannabis seeds, clones, and tissue cultures are not controlled substances isn’t law, but it is a big step forward in relaxing restrictions on cannabis.