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Cannabis seed vs fertilized seeds

I have an indoor growroom and in my recent harvest I found seeds in the buds, but I’m sure there are no male plants in the room. I’ve heard that light leakage can cause plants to become hermaphrodites. Is this true, and if so, do you have any tips for avoiding this?

Cannabis plants are monecious. This means they have the ability to be either male or female. Or in the case of hermaphroditism, they can be both. The reason to make sure there are no males or hermaphrodites in your garden is because male flowers make pollen. When pollen touches the white hairs on a flower, it makes a seed, and seeded weed gives you headaches. Even though there are reasons in nature hermaphroditism could be important, such as continuing the species in case there is no male present, hermaphroditism is generally a bad thing when talking about cannabis plants.

Light poisoning is the most common cause for a normal plant to hermaphrodite.

Light poisoning refers to the flowering night cycle of a plant being unnaturally interrupted with light. The best way to prevent this is to close yourself inside your darkened room during the daylight, and then after allowing a few minutes for your eyes to adjust to the dark, check for any light leaks from covered windows, door jams, etc. Also cover all timer and appliance lights with tape.

Negative stressors can combine with small interruptions of the light cycle to cause hermaphroditism, especially with less-stable, clone-only hybridized strains. When the night cycle is abnormally interrupted, it sends a mixed hormonal signal to the plant. This can cause a full female plant to throw some male flowers. Male flowers are easy to identify, especially when side by side with female flowers. Male flowers look like small bunches of bananas, which will take a week or two to swell before they burst and release their pollen.

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Finding a hermaphrodite in your growroom can happen at any stage of the flowering cycle and is indicated by the presence of male flowers growing on the same plant as female flowers. As with all species in nature this can occur in varying degrees. A plant can become slightly or majorly hermaphroditic. In cases where singular male flowers are found between the branch and stalk nodes, you should be diligently removing them as they grow. You must re-inspect the plant top to bottom every few days to be sure pollination and seeding doesn’t occur. If you find male flowers (anthers) actually growing from within the female flowers (buds) the situation is a little more dire. You can still remove all the male anatomy as it appears, but it will be harder to find and much more prevalent. This is a horrible discovery that leads to a tough decision: Should you let the plant live and risk the whole crop being ruined by seeds?

In either case, once hermaphroditism has compromised the safety and purity of your sensimilla, the plant should not be propagated further. Remember, once a hermy, always a hermy. The plant pictured here is in the tenth and what should have been the final week of ripening, but a timer failed and one light stayed on continuously for almost two weeks, causing this vegetative regrowth. Because the light was continuous, the plant made no pollen. This method of re-vegging can be used to save a flowering plant you have no copies of, but be careful, as this may cause some strains to hermaphrodite.

Purposefully causing a plant to hermaphrodite is called selfing. Gibberellic acid or colloidal silver is typically sprayed onto the female plant. This technique is used to make feminized seeds and uses the plant’s ability to be both male and female to force a female plant to produce male flowers. The pollen contained in these male flowers can only produce female seeds. Just keep in mind that feminized plants should not be used for breeding, as they were produced without a true male, making them genetically inferior.

Cannabis seeds

Cannabis seeds are ready to plant and grow once they successfully germinate or once the root has broken through the protective outer shell of the seed. Cannabis seeds are available in regular, feminized, and auto-flowering forms. Home growers of cannabis often choose feminized seeds to ensure that the adult plant will be a flowering female.

Cannabis seeds are brown and about the size of a peppercorn. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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More about marijuana seeds

As with all angiosperms, or flowering plants, cannabis produces seeds that contain all of the genetic information needed for growth and reproduction. When a seed is planted, the translation of this genetic material dictates each unique physical characteristic the mature plant will have. If these are desirable traits, like potency, smell, vigor, etc., a breeder can select for these through a long process of genetic stabilization through generations, which eventually leads to the creation of a cultivar, or strain.

Anatomy of a cannabis seed

Cannabis seeds are about the size of a peppercorn, ovular in form, and pointed on each end with a ridge that transverses longitudinally on only one side from tip to tip. It is this ridge that opens up during germination. The opposite side is rounded. The body of the seed is brown, but underdeveloped and unfertilized seeds can have an off-white color and are typically smaller in size.

Photo by: Illustration by Weedmaps

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The body of a marijuana seed is spotted or striped, most commonly with light brown specks, but some varieties of cannabis can have red or yellow markings. Plant embryos are contained within seeds and house all cells that will eventually differentiate into leaves, roots, and stems. Embryos, found within the reproductive organs, are protected by an outer envelope called the pericarp. Crucial components of the plant embryo are the cotyledons, the first leaves to appear from the seed, and the radicle, which develops into the primary root. Once the seed germinates and begins its growth into a mature plant, special structures called root caps protect the growing tips of the plant.

Seedless cannabis

Today’s commercially cultivated cannabis does not contain seeds. The cultivation practices that have made this widespread are rooted in fundamental biological concepts. Cannabis is a dioecious plant, meaning it has separate male and female organisms, just like humans. If a female plant matures in the presence of a male plant, pollen from the male will fertilize the female, and its bracts will contain seeds at the end of the flowering cycle. Seedless cannabis is commonplace even when it originates from mass-produced outdoor cultivation, but not too long ago, this was not the case.

Around the middle of the 20th century, growers discovered that culling male plants as soon as they display their sexed traits would result in a crop containing exclusively unfertilized females, yielding cannabis flowers higher in THC that don’t require the removal of seeds before smoking. This seedless cannabis was from then on dubbed sinsemilla, which translates to “without seed” in Spanish. It is also commonly spelled sensimilla.

How cannabis seeds are produced

Commercial growers who produce cannabis flower desire seedless plants but there are also cultivators interested in selling seed to the growing home-cultivation market. Cannabis seed production begins with the pollen grain of a male plant. From this grain, a pollen tube grows, producing male generative cells that disperse in the form of pollen. The migration of pollen into a female plant ovule triggers pistils to fall off and seed production to begin. The bracts, which contain the ovule, will then fill with seeds. Since seeded plants are a natural outcome of pollen fertilizing eggs, producing cannabis seeds is a matter of letting nature take its course.

What’s the difference between feminized, regular, and autoflower seeds?

There are a few differences to note between these cannabis seed types.

  • Feminized seeds: The key difference between feminized cannabis seeds and regular cannabis seeds is that feminized seeds have been engineered to produce exclusively female plants. This matters for cultivation since smokable flowers are produced only by female plants. A male plant can potentially ruin a harvest if it pollinates nearby female plants, causing them to produce flowers full of seeds.
  • Autoflowering seeds: Autoflowering seeds have been carefully bred to begin and complete the flowering process based on the plant’s maturity rather than how much light the plant receives each day. Autoflowering seeds tend to be simpler to grow and don’t require as much light, making them perfect for places where the growing season is short or for indoor grows.

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Is it illegal to buy marijuana seeds?

Marijuana seeds are a cannabis product, so if you live in a place where cannabis is illegal, then seeds are also illegal. However, some people who live in places where weed is not yet legal purchase marijuana seeds from marijuana seed banks as a “souvenir.” Either way, if you want to buy marijuana seeds and cannabis is illegal where you live, then you face some degree of risk. On the other hand, if you live in a state where cannabis is legal, especially one where home cultivation is allowed, then you should be able to purchase seeds legally. Remember, even in states where cannabis is legal, it’s still illegal nationally in the US. To cut your risk as much as possible, purchase cannabis seeds from in-state or local providers so they don’t have to cross state lines or be transported by mail.

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Where to buy marijuana seeds

Seeds are sold in brick-and-mortar locations legally in many countries across Europe and are often traded online. As cannabis legalization expands in North America, more retail locations are carrying seeds as well. Feminized seeds are the most popular, but providers likely have access to many strains of mixed male and female seeds. Carefully sifting through cannabis flower before using the grinder will usually turn up a few seeds, too. Professionally sourced seeds assure quality genetics and viability, but saved seeds can be a cheap source of cannabis genetics for the hobbyist grower.

Do dispensaries sell seeds?

If you live in a state or country where cannabis is legal, and where individuals are allowed to grow their own plants at home, then you should be able to buy seeds at most legal dispensaries. This might not be the case if you’re in a location that does not allow home growing. The best thing to do is simply check your local laws and ask your local budtender.

How much do marijuana seeds cost?

A pack of marijuana seeds—typically containing around ten or so seeds—will run you anywhere from around $40 on the low end and as much as $400 or $500 on the upper end. The price of marijuana seeds depends on a number of variables including:

  • Quality of genetics
  • The reputation of the breeder who produced the seeds
  • How rare or potent the strain is
  • Whether they’re regular, feminized, or autoflowering (feminized and autoflowering marijuana seeds tend to cost more)

How many seeds should I buy?

If you’re trying to grow just a handful of plants for your own private consumption, then you can get away with purchasing one or two packs at a time. Since most commercially sold marijuana seeds come in packages of 10 or so seeds, 10 to 20 seeds should be enough to ensure a good harvest even if a few seeds fail. This is a baseline for a small, private crop andany larger operations should scale up accordingly.

How to store cannabis seeds

Seed providers sometimes vacuum-seal and freeze seeds for long-term storage, but commercially-available seeds in Dutch headshops are sold in small, plastic vials at room temperature and low humidity (6-12%).

Humidity and light is the main enemy of seed storage. Beyond that, seeds can remain viable for up to two years when stored in even the most haphazard conditions. Marijuana seeds swept up off the floor or found in the bottom of a drawer have been known to grow into vigorous young plants.

Germinating cannabis seeds

Germination is the process of beginning the vegetative growth of the new cannabis plant. Sometimes referred to colloquially as “popping,” this process starts when the seed is exposed to water and light. The seed abandons its state of dormancy, or quiescence, and resumes essential metabolic processes that feed on energy stores to delicately rupture open the shell and grow its first root. This root will elongate until it has taken hold of the medium, after which it will pull two small embryonic leaves (cotyledons) from the seed shell. Cotyledons are in the seed before germination and are not considered “true” leaves. The cotyledons will grow until they are about one centimeter long, and once the stem below this is around five centimeters tall, another set up true leaves will grow out of the top and the stem between the true leaves and cotyledons will continue to elongate.

Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Generally speaking, cannabis is a hardy plant that will grow and even thrive in a diversity of environments. However, to assure germination, several steps can be taken. One method calls for a moist paper towel inserted into a plastic bag. Once the first root appears, the seedling must be carefully transferred to some soil before the root takes hold to the paper towel.

Cannabis seeds can also be germinated in a peat pellet. Plant the seed only just below the surface. Once the seedling has taken hold in the pellet, directly transfer it to a pot; the roots will grow right through the soft fabric that encases the peat, at which point the pellet can be directly placed into soil. Whichever method is used, keep the temperature between 70 -90 degrees Fahrenheit (21-32 degrees Celsius), ideally at 78 degrees Fahrenheit (about 26 degrees Celsius), keeping seedlings covered to maintain humidity. Seedlings and young cuttings require photosynthetically active radiation that is more heavily weighted in the blue portion spectrum; a common fluorescent desk lamp will suffice until they are about 5 inches, or about 13 centimeters, tall.

Clone vs Seeds: What Grows the Best Pot and Why?

There are many potential variables to consider when growing marijuana. The first is whether you will start with seeds, clones, or clone tissue culture. Each option has its own set of pros and cons, and you can either fail apically or experience great success with both. Here’s what you should consider when faced with the clones vs. seeds debate.

Seeds are a reliable method for growing marijuana and are easy to find. Clones, on the other hand, are fast, efficient, and exactly like their mother plant. Although tissue culture clones are almost identical to traditional clones, they take up less space and eliminate the risk of pests and diseases. However, clone tissue culture, seed, or clones all have their disadvantages.

Clones

Clones are cuttings from a mature mother marijuana plant that grow into new identical plants. A clone is a genetic copy of the parent plant, which can either be good or bad. They are sometimes called “starts.”

Since they are exactly the same as their parent plant, they will inherit all of the features and characteristics of that plant. That means, if the parent plant had health issues, the cloned plant would also have problems from the start.

For that reason, clones should come from strong, healthy plants that are free from pests, bacteria, or any noticeable disease. It’s a good idea to learn about its parent plant’s lineage. That way, you know the potential yield, height, and flowering time.

You can also ensure you are creating the ideal environment when you know your clone’s strain. When selecting your cutting, inspect the roots. Clones do not have a taproot. They develop secondary roots, which are also known as a fibrous root system. A clone with a well-developed root system is more likely to survive.

Pros of Growing Clones

Here are the pros and cons of growing marijuana from a clone.

You Know What You are Getting

Since a clone is a genetic match to the mother plant, you can pick out which plants you want to clone. By selecting a healthy mature plant, you avoid passing some of the parent’s defects and health issues onto the new cloned plant. Farmers usually pick the healthiest and highest-yielding plants.

Saves Time

When you use clones to grow your marijuana, you save time that you would have otherwise used waiting for the seeds to germinate. Although some growers let their clones’ root system develop before planting them, you can also root your cutting directly and wait for it to grow.

Grows Faster

Compared to seeds, clones have a head start. Since they are cuttings from a mature plant and have an established root system, they will grow faster. This also means you will harvest sooner.

Always Females

Your plant’s gender is guaranteed. Clones are cuttings taken from a female marijuana plant, making them an exact copy of the parent plant. As long as the mother is female, marijuana growers have no chance of getting a male plant, which is a possibility with seeds.

More Harvests

A cloned marijuana plant matures faster. This is because the clone skips the germination and seedling stage of a plant life cycle, allowing you to get in more harvests per year. If you are growing your clones outdoors, you will be able to get several extra harvests per year before winter. However, if you are an indoor grower, you can harvest year-round.

Cheaper

When you have a reliable mother plant, you have a constant source of clones. Creating clones from a single plant is a lot cheaper than buying seeds every season. A single plant can produce multiple clones, and that clone can create more clones. This, in theory, could create an unlimited number of plants.

If you are looking to grow the cheapest way possible, consider growing and keeping a strong, healthy, and high-yielding mother plant. Then use cuttings from the mother plant to grow your marijuana.

Cons of Growing Clones

Harder to Find

Finding reliable, healthy, and high-yielding clones is a challenge. You must know a grower, or live in an area that sells starts, while seeds can be easily found via online seed banks.

Science is creating new methods such as micropropagation, but don’t expect to find tissue culture clones for sale anytime soon. Until then, seeds are the best way to ensure a healthy marijuana plant.

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Mother Plants Get Sick

Clones are susceptible to their parent’s health issues, which could include low immunity against pests, fungus, rotting of the roots, or even bacteria. If the mother plant had genetic issues such as low yields, pests, and any other disease, any new plants will as well. Tissue culture cloning helps prevent this problem; however, there aren’t many tissue culture clones for sale to the average grower.

It’s Harder to Grow Clones

Clones are fragile and should be handled with care. Freshly cut clones must be handled carefully and are sensitive to light and nutrients. If cloned incorrectly, your plants might die or remain in shock for a long time, rendering them useless.

Mother’s Must be Strong

Clones have to work a little harder at the beginning, so they must come from a strong plant. If you use a clone from a mother plant that was not well established, your new plants may experience stunted growth, shock, or death.

Clones have many benefits, but marijuana plants are most often grown from seeds. This is the easiest and most natural method.

Seeds

This is the easiest and most natural method.

Seeds are Easier to Grow

With the help of the internet, many seed banks can legally ship marijuana seeds to your mailbox. This makes it easy to find a wide variety of marijuana strains, as well as purchase feminized seeds. Feminized seeds remove the risk of seeds being male.

Plants grown from seed tend to be easier to grow, with sturdier root systems and branches. Healthier plants tend to produce higher yields. Seeds are also a good value. You can store seeds for years or fertilize your plants for an endless supply of marijuana seeds.

Of course, there is a chance that some of the seeds will not germinate, especially if they weren’t stored properly. Seeds can also take longer to grow, meaning you cannot grow as many per year.

Seeds are the More Natural Route

Seeds are produced by the process of pollination. When pollen from male cannabis plants reaches a female plant, her flowers will include seeds. Unlike the flowers that are typically used for marijuana, these won’t form into large colas or have as many trichomes. The seeds are harvested from the flowers and used for growing new plants.

Unlike a clone, each seed is genetically unique. That means you will have a variety of marijuana plants with varying susceptibility to pests and diseases. If one plant doesn’t perform well, another seed may do better. You can also breed plants to create your perfect plant.

Seeds are nature’s way of encouraging genetic diversity. Each seed represents a cross between a male and a female cannabis plant instead of a single plant. Seeds may be created at random, or carefully bred by growers.

Advantages of Growing Seeds

  • Marijuana plants grown from seed have a taproot, which provides the plant with more support as it grows.
  • Seeds are naturally resistant to pests and diseases; plants grown from a seedling do not have any inherited diseases or pests.
  • Compared to clones, which are limited to the available mature plants in your area, there are many varieties of seeds to choose from, either online or in stores.
  • Seeds can be stored for a long time (as long as the temperatures are right). Clones must be used, or they will die.

Disadvantages of Growing Seeds

  • Seeds are delicate while germinating and can be crushed easily. It takes some practice to get used to handling germinated seeds.
  • For the first six weeks, the grower will likely need to pay more attention to their plants than with clones. They will need to determine the sex of their plants and remove any males if they intend to grow non-feminized sinsemilla.
  • Unlike clones, seeds take time to germinate and reach the same height as cloned plants.
  • Germinating marijuana seeds can be tricky if you are new to it.

Should you grow with seeds if marijuana growing is just a hobby?

Seeds are the best option for a hobby grower because they are easy to find and produce stronger plants (which can lead to higher yields). They’re also a good idea because there are more options. It is fairly easy to find a strain that grows well in your area, fits a particular growing space, or is suitable for first-time growers. Plus, since growing is a hobby, you can be patient as the seeds take time to sprout.

The most challenging aspect of growing from seed—determining the sex of your plants—is remedied by using feminized seeds. These types of seeds are guaranteed to be female and therefore produce sinsemilla weed.

Your yield will also be better with seeds simply because a cloned plant is older. Marijuana is an annual plant that lasts for a little less than a year. If your plant is a clone, it’s already lived to maturity when it was part of its parent plant. However, once you flower your clone, it has only lived as long as a seedling and will produce limited yields. As a result, clones vs seeds yield is a big reason why many people prefer seeds.

It is also gratifying to know that you have nurtured your marijuana plant from seed to harvest.

Where you are going to grow should also be a consideration. When you look at seeds vs. clones, outdoor growing tends to be a bit challenging for clones. With lowered defenses such as the lack of a taproot, and other built-in seedling benefits, outdoor-grown clones need a lot of support to avoid shock and environmental attack.

If You are Growing Commercially, Clones are King

If you are growing marijuana commercially, compared to seeds, clones are the best. The main reason is that they take less time to mature since they are cuttings from mature plants. Clones skip the seedling stage and jump straight to the vegetative stage. However, their yields are less than that of seeds.

Clones are also better because you can get several plants from a single mature plant. You can also reproduce the desired qualities of one plant in hundreds of clones. You’ll need to have some experience growing marijuana if you’d like to create your own clones; however, it is very economical if you are concerned about the bottom line.

Creating Clones from Seed Plants

If you are planning to grow marijuana for a few years, it is a good idea to learn how to create clones. Even if you initially start with seeds, you may end up growing a plant that you absolutely love and would like to grow again. Luckily, taking clones from feminized seeds is a straightforward process.

First of all, let’s start with a clarification. You can’t technically clone seeds; you can clone the plants grown from feminized seeds, and there are very few reasons not to do so. Of course, when you look at clones vs seeds yield, you will find that the yields of a cloned plant will be smaller but, the cloned plant does not lose its potency. It also inherits all the best qualities of its mother plant.

However, the downside is that some clones might produce “hermie plants.” Hermie is another name for hermaphrodite, meaning that the clone will produce both male and female parts. If this happens, do not clone using that mother plant again.

That’s why the hardest part of cloning is choosing a good “mother” plant. The best plant should be at least four weeks old, three months at most. It’s a good idea to stop any fertilization (especially any nitrogen) at least a week before obtaining your cutting; this ensures that the clones have better root development.

Before you do any cutting, ensure that the mother plant does not have any pests, bacteria, or signs of diseases. Make sure to check the soil pH and temperature and make the necessary adjustments before planting your clone.

Remember, your clone will be the same age as the mother plant, so you must take your cuttings when the mother plant is in its vegetative stage. Clones obtained from branches develop roots faster and are sturdy enough to support the plant.

How to Clone a Marijuana Plant

  1. Obtain a cutting from a mother plant. Use a sharp and clean blade or scissors to cut your chosen branch at a 45-degree angle. Ensure that there are about three to four nodes above the cut.
  2. Immediately after cutting, place it in a cup of water. Leaving it exposed even for a few seconds can result in damage to the clone.
  3. Trim the cutting to remove the leaves. Trim the stems between the cut and the leaves at the top.
  4. Plant the stem in a small pot with growing medium. When planting, cover it with enough soil. Make sure to include some of the trimmed nodes as it speeds up the rooting and growing process.
  5. (optional) Add plant hormones such as rooting powder to encourage root growth
  6. Cover the cutting with clear plastic to preserve moisture and keep it warm
  7. After a few weeks, look for developing roots

That is the traditional method of cloning. You may want to plant several starts to improve the chances of a successful clone, in case some do not develop.

Now, science and technology have led to newer and better ways to grow marijuana. Many believe that tissue culture propagation, a different type of cloning, is the future of marijuana cultivation.

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Tissue Culture Propagation

Tissue Culture Propagation is the process of taking a small cutting from a mother plant and placing it in a sterile environment. That environment is typically a jar containing a plant preservative mixture composition (agar gel). The mixture provides the cutting with the right nutrients and hormones necessary for healthy root and sprout development. Once developed, it is transplanted into a medium that can accommodate its growth.

Here’s a more detailed look into how to clone plants using tissue culture.

Initiation

Tissue culture uses small pieces of the mother plant to make clones. These tiny pieces are washed and sterilized. They are then placed in a jelly-like substance rich in nutrients and hormones. The hormones stimulate the division of the plant tissue cells leading to the formation of many cells, which form a shapeless mass referred to as callus.

Root Development

Next, the callus is transferred into another jar containing another substance with plant hormones. These hormones stimulate root development. The callus with roots is then transferred to another jar with jelly containing different hormones, stimulating sprout development.

Formation of Sprouts

The cannabis tissue culture lab clones now have roots, and the sprout is separated into many tiny cannabis plants.

Transplantation

Once the plantlets are hardened enough, they are then transplanted into the growing medium. During the hardening process, the seedlings are grown under low light and high humidity. Hardening cannabis tissue culture lab clones makes it easier for them to survive in harsh weather conditions.

How Tissue Culture Differs from Clones

Unlike seeds and clones, tissue culture lets the grower preserve a living specimen by using a small piece of plant tissue. They then use that sample to produce several identical plants.

Cannabis tissue culture for clones is not the same as a clone; it is better than clones. It is a little slower, but it grows faster than seed and has more disease-resistant than a clone. Like a clone, cannabis tissue culture for clones shares its mother’s gender, so there is no chance of males.

The life of a tissue culture starts from the cutting of the mother plant. The cutting is first trimmed and sterilized, then placed in a jar containing nutrient cultures, including nutrients, hormones, and sugar mixture. The dense tissue culture controls the plant cutting.

The sample remains in the culture mixture as long as the grower deems it necessary. The introduction of nutrients and hormones triggers the growth and root development of the clone. When the tissue culture clone is tall enough and ready to be multiplied, it is cut into several individually cloned tissues.

The diced pieces are then taken through the same process of washing and sterilizing. They are then placed in jars with a different hormone to encourage root development. The samples are developed until they are hardened well enough to be in the growing environment. The new tissue culture clones have identical genetics with the mother plants but are disease and pest-free.

If you are well organized, a small sample can help you produce hundreds of tissue culture clones, all without contamination from the mother plant.

Point to Note: All cultures should be maintained at 24 ̊C, and you should use fluorescent lighting with 16-hour light exposure.

Pros of Growing Tissue Culture Clones

Disease Free

Growing clones from tissue culture let the grower preserve the plant’s genetics while eliminating the effects of pests and diseases. Tissue culture plants are more vigorous than a traditionally derived clone.

Growing clones from tissue cultures are more efficient and high-yielding. This helps growers save money and increase revenue.

Superior Plants

Tissue culture can produce superior plants at a better value, but it is not for everyone. The process of cloning using tissue culture is neither short nor easy. This means it may be a while before things like hemp tissue culture clones are readily available for purchase.

Cons of Growing Tissue Culture Clones

More Expensive Process

Tissue culture can be of great value in the long run; however, the process to set up and develop hemp tissue culture clones is expensive. The process requires very skilled cannabis growers, and there still aren’t many in the current job market.

Require Clean Rooms and Equipment

Tissue culture cloning also requires both clean rooms and expensive equipment to filter the air and minimize the chances of contamination, both of which are costly to build and acquire.

Longer Growing Cycle

Growing from culture can also take longer than clones. Tissue culture clones mature slower than cuttings, taking close to a month before they can be transplanted. Traditional clones take about two weeks to be transplanted.

The Future of Cloning?

Tissue culture cultivation is the latest in marijuana growing tech and is considered the future of marijuana cultivation.

Compared to seeds or a cutting, a tissue culture clone is more viable. It has distinct advantages, such as the ability to eliminate pests and diseases while maintaining the mother plant’s genetic composition. Add to that a capacity to produce hundreds of pants from tiny pieces of the mother plant is also another reason why tissue culture clones seem like the answer to many problems.

However, the process of creating tissue culture is expensive. You’ll need a sterile environment, a specialist to create the cultures and costly equipment. Even though the process is utilized right now, it definitely feels futuristic to the average grower nowadays.

Frequently Asked Questions

Many people have questions when trying to determine whether they should use seeds or clones. Here are a few of those questions:

Are clones quicker than seed?

Clones take less time because they are cut from a grown plant and already have a head start on root development. Seeds also need to germinate before going through the vegetative and flowering stage, adding weeks to their development. The fact that clones grow faster also means there is a lower yield.

Are dispensaries allowed to sell clones or seeds?

Yes, many dispensaries sell clones or seeds to either licensed or recreational growers. This depends on the laws in your area. Clones cannot be shipped via mail like seeds, so they must be purchased or obtained from individuals or stores.

Just like you would online, research where you plan to buy your clones so that you can ensure healthy and potent plants with good yields.

Are plants grown from seeds of clones identical to parents?

Typically, No. Any plant grown from seed will have the genetic makeup of both the male and female parents. If your female clone develops seeds, it has been pollinated by a male. Clone seeds, therefore, will have both the male and female plant’s characteristics.

However, the process of selfing can induce a female clone to produce a male flower. The pollen from that flower is used to self-fertilize the female flower on the same plant. The fertilized female flower then produces feminized clone seeds. These seeds will produce identical plants because the clone pollinated itself.

Can you make feminized seeds from clone?

Yes, you can make feminized seeds from clones. This is because it does not matter if the plant is from clones or seeds. The important thing is getting the clone to produce seeds, and then following the same process to feminize those seeds. As long as the clone is female, you can fertilize it using any other male plant.

Are weed clones weaker than seeds?

Yes. This is because clones are branches without roots, and the first thing they develop after being planted is a root system. Compared to seedlings, clones are weaker because they do not have a taproot that travels deeper into the soil, offering support, and reaching water and nutrients located deep within.

Clones also develop a single node, meaning a single branch per node, while cannabis plants from seeds develop two-sided nodes, meaning that they develop twice the number of branches per plant, yielding more than the clones.

Can auto grow seeds be cloned?

Although it is quite challenging to clone auto-flowering strains of marijuana, it is not impossible. Some growers claim to have done it successfully but were not rewarded in terms of yields. Therefore, if you are doing it on an experimental basis, give it a try; however, it is hardly ever recommended.

Whether you choose seeds or clones, you’ll want to give your plants their best possible start. a Pot for Pot’s Complete Grow Kit has everything you need to grow marijuana outdoors – from the pot and the soil, to the watering can and trimming scissors.

What is tissue culture propagation?

Tissue Culture Propagation is the process of taking a small cutting from a mother plant and placing it in a sterile environment.

Why would someone opt to clone their marijuana plant?

There are two reasons why growers opt to clone; one being a lack of access to quality seeds, and two being a preference of using clones over seeds.

At What Temperatures Should Cultures Be Maintained At?

All cultures should be maintained at 24 ̊C, and you should use fluorescent lighting with 16-hour light exposure.