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Cascade train seeds

Spitfire

(Tropaeolum majus)
EXCLUSIVE – Spitfire’s brilliant, scarlet-red blossoms shine out amongst trailing lily pad shaped green foliage and their nectar is adored by hovering hummingbirds. Train them up short trellises or tripods for a cascade of bright blossoms or use the abundant, fiery-colored spurred flowers and their handsome leaves as a perfect way to disguise neglected areas, soften fences or walls, or tumble from big containers. Both flowers and leaves are edible with a flavor reminiscent of watercress with a pinch of honey.

ANNUAL VINE

EASY TO START OUTDOORS

Sow seeds in spring once all danger of frost is over in full sun (or part shade in hot climates). Nasturtiums need no added fertilizer in most soils. Poke seeds into well-worked soil about 1 inch deep and 3 to 4 inches apart. Press soil firmly over the seeds and keep moist. When seedlings are large enough to handle, thin 10 to 12 inches apart so plants will have ample room to grow.

TO START EARLY INDOORS

Sow 2 seeds each in individual 4-inch pots of well-drained seed starting mix 3 weeks before last expected frost date. Cover 1 inch deep. Provide a strong light source. When seedlings have several sets of leaves, pinch out the weaker seedling leaving 1 seedling per pot. When weather is evenly in the 50°F (10°C) range, gradually acclimate to outdoor conditions. Transplant 10 to 12 inches apart in full sun.

GROWING NOTES

Climbing nasturtiums are easy to grow in any well-drained soil. You’ll need to train young plants onto their supports with loose ties, then they’ll climb easily and bloom non-stop. Do not let plants dry out during blooming season. Spitfire’s glowing blossoms are summer beacons for hungry hummingbirds.

Nasturtium Flowers – How To Grow Nasturtiums

Nasturtium flowers are versatile; attractive in the landscape and useful in the garden. Nasturtium plants are fully edible and growing nasturtiums can be used to lure aphids away from other plants in the garden.

Nasturtium plants are easy to grow and may be climbing, cascading, or bushy. Care of nasturtiums is minimal; in fact, nasturtium plants are one of those specimens that thrive on neglect. Rich, fertile soil or too much fertilizer results in lush foliage growth and few nasturtium flowers.

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The old-fashioned nasturtium, Tropaeolum majus, is popular in the garden as an edible. Use nasturtium flowers as a spiller in window boxes and hanging baskets. Plant bush-type nasturtiums as aphid traps in the vegetable garden. Growing nasturtiums may add a peppery taste to salads or decorate a cake.

Nasturtium Varieties

Easy to grow nasturtium plants come in more than 50 varieties. Whichever type you choose for the garden, plant in a full to part sun area with well-drained but otherwise poor soil for more and bigger blooms.

Dwarf and variegated nasturtium varieties add an ornamental element to small containers or mixed in with solid green foliage plants and white blooms. If using the nasturtium in a container combination, make sure the other plants do not require a lot of water or fertilizer, as the nasturtium needs little of either.

How To Grow Nasturtiums

Large seeds of nasturtium plants should be sown directly into their permanent location, as nasturtium flowers do not transplant well. If you must start seeds of nasturtium flowers and then transplant them, use peat pots which can be planted into the ground without disturbing the roots of the growing nasturtium seedling.

The seed coat may be manipulated for faster germination when growing nasturtium, nick the seed or soak overnight in lukewarm water. Plant immediately into a container or area of the garden which allows plenty of room for growth. You may place a trellis near the planting area of climbing nasturtium varieties and train the colorful vines to climb with little effort.

Now that you see the ease of how to grow nasturtiums, add several in the spring and summer landscape. Care of nasturtiums is amazingly simple, plant them and forget them, except to enjoy this perky, little flower.

Cascade Organic Hops

West Coast Seeds ships anywhere in North America. However, we are not able to ship garlic, potatoes, asparagus crowns, bulbs, onion sets, Mason bee cocoons, or nematodes outside of Canada. We regret, we cannot accept returns or damages for orders outside of Canada. The minimum shipping charge to the US is $6.99.

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West Coast Seeds ships anywhere in North America. However, we are not able to ship garlic, potatoes, asparagus crowns, bulbs, onion sets, Mason bee cocoons, or nematodes outside of Canada. We regret, we cannot accept returns or damages for orders outside of Canada. The minimum shipping charge to the US is $6.99.

From $13.99 Sold Out

From $13.99 Sold Out

From $13.99 Sold Out

From $13.99 Sold Out

From $13.99 Sold Out

From $13.99 Sold Out

More details about Cascade Organic Hops

CERTIFIED ORGANIC. Cascade organic hops rhizomes are among the most widely used hops in North American brewing. This is an extremely versatile and flavourful variety that is typical in IPA recipes, pale ale recipes, and others. Cascade is the true workhorse of the craft brewing industry. Be sure to provide a tall trellis for all your hops plants, as they are vigorous climbers. Harvest the flowers or “cones” in late summer.

Aroma: Spiced floral with distinct but subtle undertones of citrus and grassy notes.
Flavour: The citrus flavour is higher than its aroma. Very smooth.

Quick Facts:

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Cascade Organic Hops

All About Cascade Organic Hops

Latin

Latin
Humulus lupulus
Family: Cannabaceae

Difficulty

Difficulty
Easy

We Recommend:

We Recommend: Cascade Organic (HO100) is a great all purpose variety, and probably the most widely used in the brewing industry.

Season & Zone

Season & Zone
Season: Warm season
Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
Zone: 3 and up

Timing

Timing
Plant hops rhizomes in early spring, as soon as the ground can be worked. If the weather turns and hard frost threatens after planting, mulch over the planted area with straw, leaves, or even plywood in order to provide some frost protection. If you cannot plant outside immediately, they can be stored slightly damp in the refrigerator for several weeks.

Starting

Starting
Plant your rhizomes, woody stems from 10cm to 15cm (4” to 6”) in length, as soon as they arrive in the mail. Plant about 10 cm (4”) deep with the buds pointing up with the rhizomes either lying down or pointing up, whichever direction the buds are growing in.

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Growing

Growing
Ideal pH: 6.0-7.0. Be sure to train them to twine around a support when they are about 30cm tall (1’), as hops have been known to reach up to 7.5 meters in a year. Mulch with loose soil as it is important the rhizomes do not dry out while establishing themselves. Hops are heavy feeders that require nitrogen rich amendments. First year growth will be limited while the roots establish themselves but you can expect to harvest some cones in the first year, more in the second and a full harvest in the third.

If you are planting more than one rhizome space about 1m apart (3’); space different varieties 2m (6’) apart. There is little difference in the appearance of hop varieties. It will be much easier when harvesting the cones to grow them some distance from each other. In the second year you can expect several bines to have developed. Cut back the weakest of them, leaving the strongest 2 or 3 to grow out.

Harvest

Harvest

Hops are ready for harvest when they become light and papery to the touch and when the leaves of the cones start to turn yellow at the edges. The lupulin powder, that contains the essential oils, turns golden yellow and becomes quite fragrant. Spread the flowers out in a single layer on a screen and air dry for a couple days with a fan blowing across them. They are ready to store in the freezer in an airtight baggy when the cones barely break when bent in half.

Seed Info

Seed Info
In optimum conditions at least 65% of seeds will germinate. Usual seed life: 2 years. Per 100’ row: 400-600 seeds, per acre: 96M -120M seeds.

Diseases & Pests

Diseases & Pests
Watch for slug/snail damage to young seedlings. Keep the area free from debris where these pests like to nest.