Posted on

Do cannabis seeds need loghtor dark

Germinate seeds under light?

Why is darkness recommended for germination? Doesnt seem to make much sense to me, why would darkness be beneficial to the seed in any way? Just curious. I have some seedlings already but decided to go for a few more plants, so i’ve put the seeds in the pots in the same room, threw some black garbage bags over the pots to avoid some of the light + it add more moisture..

I’ve tried germination using a few methods, nowadays i always plant the seeds directly into the large pots. I’ve noticed that it seems to speed up the development quite a bit. I guess it’s becaue it’s much less stressful. I don’t get those methods of first germinate the seed using paper, then putting it in a cup, then moving it to larger puts etc.. that’s seems pretty stupid and is just a hassle imo, the seed and the seedling should be handled as little as possible i think.

ilyaas123
Well-Known Member

You don’t need a black bag over them, just treat them as any old seed and stick them in dirt and wait for them to pop out. There is nothing different about germination of a cannabis seed compared to germination of any other similar seed i.e. klip dagga, catnip, fruit seeds etc.

You do not need lights to germinate cannabis seeds and if you do then it is not at all going to help speed up the process; I mean, how are lights going to help your seed absorb more moisture and root?

cat of curiosity
Well-Known Member

light kills roots. end of story.

as for germinating, you don’t wait on seeds that don’t germ to sprout. you only plant root tips. for smaller cups, it’s called root building, you get bound in a cup, then transplant larger, to utilize the maximum amount of medium. if you plant in a large container, roots grow to the outside of the pot, then coil, with virgin soil between center and perimeter. big waste, especially if you’re paying for the privilege.

NanoBrainz
Active Member

ilyaas123: I’ll leave the bags on for now, the HPS does dry out the top layer quite fast.. and no, i’m not saying the seed NEEDS light, i know it doesnt. Just wondering why total darkness is always recommended in guides.

catofcuriosity: I’ve heard that too, but a lot of times i’ve germinated seeds in clear plastic cups, the roots has been exposed to my 1200w HPS lights, no problem at all.. The pots i’m using now are of the usual kind (black) and the roots are not exposed to light, but yes it’s possible that light maybe seeks its way through the soil and therefore it could be harmful to the roots..

I usually have 100% sucess rate of germination, so it’s not an issue that some will not sprout. If they don’t no big deal since i always have 2 as back-ups in cups. And yes i’ve also read that it’s important to build a root ball, but i’ve never seen any difference to be honest (i always examine the roots of the finished plants).

ilyaas123
Well-Known Member

Well. At the end of the day it’s all up to you and I can’t force you to do whatever so good luck. Doing what you are doing will not harm your plants but is unnecessary.

NanoBrainz
Active Member

Well my argument was that it seems unnecessary and possibly harmful to go through the paper method, putting it in a cup, transplating (some seems to transplant 2-3 times – very stressful to the plant to say the least). That’s a a real hassle when handling a lot of plants.

But yes, each to his own i guess.

cat of curiosity
Well-Known Member

Well my argument was that it seems unnecessary and possibly harmful to go through the paper method, putting it in a cup, transplating (some seems to transplant 2-3 times – very stressful to the plant to say the least). That’s a a real hassle when handling a lof of plants.

But yes, each to his own i guess.

ilyaas123
Well-Known Member

Agreed, You do it right then you get a 100% success rate and it’s not that hard so it’s almost impossible to mess up on it unless you have really shaky hands or are just purposely trying to kill them before they even get to absorb some light

NanoBrainz
Active Member

yeah never had a plant die on me because of transplant, i just mean it seems like the plant does develop a bit quicker when not under the stress of transplanting several times.. i’m quite sure a lot of the roots are harmed when transplanting, even if very careful, the roots are extremely fragile (newly developed parts)

midnitetoak
Active Member

Find what works for you & stay with it- you don’t have to copy others or do what anyone says to make up your own rules

churchhaze
Well-Known Member

I’m with you 100% on this. I’ve never understood why so many people/guides insist on putting seeds in the dark while germinating. There’s no scientific basis behind this. In fact, for many plants like lettuce, light is required for high success rate and speed.

One experiment that’s repeated a lot with lettuce seeds is having a sequence of pulses, either 660nm (R) or 730nm (FR) followed by dark, and what they determined was only the pulse at the end of the sequence mattered. If the last pulse in the sequence was red, most of the seeds would germinate, and if the last pulse was far red, most would fail to germinate.

For example, if your pulse sequence was [R, FR, R, FR, R], it would be equivalent to [R] since R was the last pulse in the sequence and all the seeds would germinate.

Light helps lettuce seeds germinate, so why would it inhibit cannabis germination?

With pot, light seems to contribute little to germination success however.

See also  Blue wonder seeds

Theory aside, I’ve always germinated in the light for years and see no reason not to. I feel like the plant wants to start its life off in the day, and not have an extended period in the dark as its first experience.

Why is darkness recommended for germination? Doesnt seem to make much sense to me, why would darkness be beneficial to the seed in any way? Just curious. I have some seedlings already but decided to go for a few more plants, so i’ve put the seeds in the pots in the same room, threw some black garbage bags over the pots to avoid some of the light + it add more moisture..

I’ve tried germination using a few methods, nowadays i always plant the seeds directly into the large pots. I’ve noticed that it seems to speed up the development quite a bit. I guess it’s becaue it’s much less stressful. I don’t get those methods of first germinate the seed using paper, then putting it in a cup, then moving it to larger puts etc.. that’s seems pretty stupid and is just a hassle imo, the seed and the seedling should be handled as little as possible i think.

How To Germinate Cannabis Seeds

Growing your own weed is fairly easy, as explained in our article ‘All You Need For Growing Weed At Home‘. The hardest part for some growers though, is germinating their newly bought cannabis seeds. After all, the vulnerable seedlings are easily damaged. However, making sure your cannabis seeds survive germination is essential for a successful grow. In this blog, we highlight three tested methods that let anyone germinate cannabis seeds with minimal effort.

How To Germinate Cannabis Seeds, Step 1: Get Good Genetics

We cannot stress this enough. If you want good results, you are going to need good materials to start with. In case of growing cannabis, the first thing on that list are good cannabis seeds, of course. Besides high quality cannabis seeds all you need is some water, a warm environment (between 20-25 degrees Celsius) and – lack of – light to start germinating your future cannabis plants.

Even though living weed plants love (and need) a lot of light, germinating cannabis seeds thrive better in a dark environment. And just like there are different methods of growing your own cannabis, there’s also a choice in how to make your seeds sprout.

Want good cannabis? Get good seeds!

Germination is actually a process where you activate a dry seed that is in a ‘sleeping state’. By adding water to the seed, a small root that is inside the seed-shell will want to come out in search for more water. This will make it develop into a big taproot that’ll serve as an anchor for the plant and from which more roots will sprout. Read more about root-development in this article: ‘Clones vs. Seeds: What Grows The Best Cannabis?‘

Germinate Cannabis Seeds In Water

The easiest way to germinate your cannabis seeds is to let them soak in a glass of water. The seed will absorb the water and due this process hormones will make the seed start to grow: expansion and elongation of seed embryo.
You will see them sprout after 24 to max. 48 hours. Note that you need to store the glass of water in a dark place on roomtemperature. After sprouting they are ready to plant in soil, 1cm to max 2cm deep. All they now need is love, light, water and heat!

Ready to sprout!

How To Germinate Cannabis Seeds: Wet (Paper) Towel Germination

The best known way of germinating cannabis seeds is to put them on or between wet paper towels or cotton wool. This method exists in different varieties, as it’s not so much about the paper itself, but more about the absorbency of the material. It’s very easy to make sure the ‘medium’ doesn’t get too soggy and doesn’t dry out easily. If it does dry, you can effortlessly add a few drops of water to immediately re-moisten it.

Wet paper towels are probably the most common way of germinating cannabis seeds

The goal here is to balance out the moisture so it’s not too dry, nor to wet. Go for a piece of paper that is moist all over, but doesn’t drip when you pick it up. If the seeds stay to dry, the root that’s supposed to sprout won’t be able to make it out of its shell in search for water. If the paper is too wet though, the root will come out and quickly stop looking for water; as it’s already soaked in it. This stops the development of the root, delays the growth and might even cause the seeds to rot after a while. So, be careful not to give too much water as this is one of the most common rookie mistakes when it comes to growing weed!

Transplanting In Soil

After the root has sprouted and has gained a few millimetres in length, it’s time to transplant the seedling into its soil and put it under a light-source. As a rule, a small 1cm deep hole made with your fingertip should do. Gently pick up the seeds one by one, taking care not to touch the root. Use a clean pair of tweezers and don’t squeeze. Make sure that the roots don’t cling to the paper or cotton wool. Lovingly cover the seed with a little (loose) soil and add a few drops of water. Now, all you can do is wait whole the story continues below the surface. As soon as the seedling pops her head above the ground and green leaves emerge, she’ll needf light to continue growing.

This is the part where most growers (especially the hasty ones) sometimes lose a seed. Remember that you are handling a baby plant here. The vulnerable root is easily damaged during the transplant. If you don’t trust your steady hands, it might be better to choose another germinating method.

See also  Haze mist seeds

How To Germinate Cannabis Seeds In Soil

Another common method of germinating cannabis seeds, and probably the most natural one, is to stick the seeds directly in their intended medium: the soil. You can do this with or without soaking it in root stimulator for a few hours first.

By planting cannabis seeds directly in their soil or coco – or whatever other medium you might be using – growers cause the minimal amount of stress for the plant. Direct planting also allows the taproot to immediately dive as deep into the ground as possible. Furthermore, its leaves can enjoy the light as soon as they emerge from the developing seed. This way the seedling can start its growth with a fair chance, providing you with a steady, high-yielding cannabis plant.

Cannabis seeds and sprouted seedlings require constant temperatures of around 20-25 degrees Celsius

For this method, simply prepare your medium by moisturizing it, again, without soaking the soil completely. Then take your flower pots and use your finger to make a small hole about 10-15mm deep in the top layer to put the seed in. Cover the seed up loosely and top it off with a little water. Be careful not to give too much at once though! A stream of water can cause the seed to travel further down the pot where it’s too moist – and too deep to travel back up again.

The top layer is the perfect place to germinate cannabis seeds, as it dries out faster than the soil further down the pot. This makes it easier to ensure the right level of moisture for the seed to germinate. If it gets too wet, the seeds will rot in the soil. If it stays too dry, the plant will not be triggered to emerge from its shell. Again, it’s all about finding the perfect balance between too wet and too dry.

How To Germinate Cannabis Seeds in Plugs

Last but not least on this list is the germination of cannabis seeds in special plugs. These plugs are available in various materials, especially designed for quick and efficient germination of cannabis seeds.

Plugs are a practical way to germinate cannabis seeds

Most plugs are dry blocks of (usually) coco fibre. Peat plugs are an interesting alternative, as these contain some initial nutrients to help the seedling along. After fully absorbing about 500ml of moisture, or 250ml of a root booster and another 250ml water, they slowly turn into a moist, soil-like plug. Grow plugs usually have a premade hole in which to place the seed. After sticking the seed in the top of the plug, cover it lightly with a little leftover plug fibre. It takes a few days at maximum before you see the first heads pop. As soon as the roots grow out of the bottom or the side of the plug, you can stick the entire plug, complete with its seedling, into your intended medium. These plugs make germination and the initial transplant a piece of cake.

A fantastic view on this seedling with it’s shell sticked to her leaves

After Germination: Growing Your Seedlings

So there you have it: whichever method you chose, germination should now be underway. Remember that even the best seed banks work with organic, natural materials, so 100% germination rates can never be guaranteed. If you get your technique right, though, most or all of your seeds should germinate according to plan. Once your seeds have become seedlings, the next steps of your grow await. There’s a lot of choices to make from here to harvest time: indoor or outdoor, which spot to pick, what nutrients to use, and so on. Keep an eye on our expanding grow blog collection if you want to learn more!

  • Quality Genetics
  • Secure Packaging
  • Fast Delivery

The germination of cannabis seeds is illegal in most countries. Amsterdam Genetics cannabis seeds are exclusively sold as collectable souvenirs to customers living in countries where the cultivation of cannabis is illegal. All information on this website is intended for educational purposes only and is not meant to incentivize people to engage in illegal activities.

Dark vs white cannabis seed germination test

One common question from growers is whether white cannabis seeds or dark cannabis seeds have different germination rates. When you compare cannabis seeds you may have noticed that the seeds are rarely identical. Instead you may see a range of different sizes and colours. The differences in size, colour and appearance often produce debate among growers. Why do the cannabis seeds look different and do these differences result in slightly different growth characteristics in the plants which grow from them?

Dark vs white cannabis seeds germination

In the video below you can see a germination comparison. On the left hand side, you can see 9 white Think Different autoflowering seeds. On the right hand side there are 9 dark coloured Think Different seeds.

The autoflower seeds all came from the same batch, meaning that they were produced from the same parent genetics under the same conditions. Seeds were chosen simply on the basis of their appearance. 9 white cannabis seeds and 9 dark coloured Think Different seeds were selected. They were planted in moist (but never soaked) soil and a time lapse video was made.

Note that the white cannabis seeds on the left hand side were the first seeds to germinate, with 8 out of 9 seeds sprouting pretty quickly. In the end all 9 seeds germinated on both sides, which was a 100% score. In terms of white seeds vs dark seeds (cannabis), there was no difference in the germination rates.

Does the colour of your cannabis seeds really matter?

The time lapse video shows that the colour of your cannabis seeds doesn’t have any impact on their germination rates. The colour of the shell casing is simply not an indication of the type of genetics contained inside. Nor is the colour or appearance of the exterior of the cannabis seed a good indicator of any other property, such as the future plant sex, size or potency. Only the genetic material inside the cannabis seed really determines the types of result that you can expect.

See also  Where to buy cannabis seeds onlne

Black cannabis seeds germination test results

The dark cannabis seeds (on the right hand side in the video) showed the same germination rate as the white cannabis seeds (left hand side). However, the white cannabis seeds appeared to germinate a little bit faster than the dark cannabis seeds.

White cannabis seeds germination test results

Can white cannabis seeds germinate? One curious result from the white vs dark seeds cannabis video was that the white cannabis seeds appeared to germinate slightly faster than the dark cannabis seeds. This is interesting, since the seeds all contain the same Think Different autoflowering genetics from a recent cannabis seed batch.

One suggestion is that the white cannabis seeds may have a slightly softer shell, allowing the white cannabis seeds a slightly faster germination. The experiment was repeated twice more. On each occasion, the seed germination rates were the same, but the white seeds tended to germinate faster.

Related:
The best ways to germinate cannabis seeds

Why are some cannabis seeds white and some black?

Even cannabis seeds produced from the same branch of a plant can have quite different appearances. Size, as well as shape and colour can vary. Some cannabis strains can produce seeds that have certain appearance characteristics. White Widow seeds, for example, can often be very small and pale. Frisian Dew seeds can have a slightly grey colour.

There have been many theories about how the size, shape and colour of cannabis seeds can affect the plants which they eventually produce. In reality, it’s the cannabis genetics inside the seed case which really determines the results that you can expect. The shell of the seed and the markings on it are purely cosmetic and don’t give any clues to the results you can expect.

In the years before Dutch Passion invented feminised cannabis seeds, people would often try to predict which seeds would produce female plants. Of course, this was impossible. But it didn’t stop people going to great lengths, even measuring the weight of individual seeds in an attempt to derive some knowledge from the seeds physical appearance/size.

Related:
What does the appearance of cannabis seeds indicate?

Is the colour of seeds a cosmetic difference only?

Some dark cannabis seeds have black lines on them (tiger prints), giving them a distinctive appearance. Other seeds have no significant patterns or markings on them at all. Dark black cannabis seeds can be occasionally seen.

You may also see light vs dark cannabis seeds produced from the same plant. But it’s important to note that cosmetic differences between the seed casing is not a factor which defines how the cannabis seeds grow or germinate.

The genetic material in the soft plant tissue inside the seeds is what really determines the type, size, sex and potency of the cannabis you will eventually grow. These genetics, along with the environment you provide, will control the terpenes, cannabinoids, yield and potency of your eventual cannabis harvest.

Why are some cannabis seeds white and some black? It’s just the way that nature has evolved. Seeds from all kinds of plants and trees show similar variations in their appearance.

What should you look out for in a cannabis seed?

Rather than looking at the appearance of a cannabis seed, you should focus more on the quality of breeding which has gone into the seed. Some growers think that only the largest, tiger-striped cannabis seeds will go on to produce the best plants. Yet some strains will never produce seeds like that.

Time spent researching your cannabis seeds and cannabis seed supplier is time wisely spent. Look for a seed supplier with a good track record in cannabis breeding. Preferably look for a cannabis seed supplier that has been around for a long time with a few cannabis cups and plenty of online reference grows for you to check out before you spend your cash.

Knowing whether you prefer e.g. a Kush, a THC rich vs CBD rich strain, a fruity strain or a Skunk strain is a good place to start. If the array of cannabis seed choices can seem overwhelming, the following article may help you select the best strain for you.

Related:
How to choose the best cannabis strains for you

Once you have the best cannabis seeds for you, it’s worth ensuring you get maximum germination rates with a good germination method. The preferred Dutch Passion way to germinate cannabis seeds is with moist (but never soaked) cotton pads. If you spot any issue during the growth of your cannabis seeds, we highly recommend to refer to our illustrated guide featuring the key nutrient deficiencies and excesses symptoms and how to cure them.

White cannabis seeds vs dark cannabis seeds

We hope the germination video is a useful illustration of the fact that there is little useful information that can be conveyed by the colour or darkness of a cannabis seed.

Each cannabis strain can produce subtle differences in the size and appearance of their cannabis seeds. You can even expect to see differences between cannabis seeds produced from the same plant. Don’t worry about trying to read too much into cannabis seed appearance. Instead, do your research carefully and select the best cannabis seeds for your particular needs and your specific grow situation. Enjoy growing and good luck!