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Do cannabis seeds need to cure

How to dry and cure cannabis

After cutting down marijuana plants at harvest, a proper dry and cure are crucial for buds. These processes help preserve and accentuate flavors by retaining terpenes and cannabinoids, while diminishing chlorophyll and getting rid of the vegetal taste of the plant.

The drying process is the initial drying of buds, which usually happens in the open air—freshly harvested plants can lose up to 75% of their weight to moisture loss, as well as sticks, stems, branches, and leaves that get trimmed off.

When dry trimming, drying happens first and then buds are trimmed; in wet trimming, vice versa.

A dry shouldn’t be too quick or too long: Too quick and the outside of buds will appear dry but the insides won’t be; too long and buds could develop mold.

When buds are trimmed and dried, they are placed in airtight containers for curing. This stops the loss of moisture, preserving flavors and aromas and allowing buds to take on their full flavor.

How long does it take to dry cannabis?

Drying takes about 2-7 days. The process is usually shorter when wet trimming because most of the plant material is trimmed away first and there is less plant to dry.

When dry trimming cannabis, you can hang harvested plants upside down on a line or hanger, either whole plants or branches—this prevents buds from getting flattened or misshapen as they dry.

When wet trimming, you’ll place trimmed buds on a drying rack.

Whether wet or dry trimming, check drying buds or branches after two days by bending a branch or stem—if the stem snaps, that means buds are fully dry. If they don’t snap, leave them and check the next day.

How to set up a cannabis drying room

Keep harvested weed in a dark room with temperatures between 60-70°F and humidity between 55-65%. A cheap hygrometer will help you monitor these numbers.

Add a small fan to circulate air, and you may need to add a dehumidifier or AC as well. If it’s taking too long to dry buds in your space, you may need to adjust the temperature or humidity to help the drying process.

Cannabis drying room equipment

  • Drying rack or line to hang buds for drying
  • Hygrometer to measure temperature and humidity
  • Fan
  • AC unit (optional)
  • Dehumidifier (optional)

How to dry buds without hanging on a line

When trimming wet, you’ll need a flat rack—you’ll have lots of trimmed individual buds, so you can’t hang them. Flat racks are circular with layers of mesh, and are great for airflow.

Check wet-trimmed buds drying in the flat rack after 2-3 days by giving them a little squish. If they’re still too wet, leave them and check again the next day.

How to cure marijuana

Check out Johanna’s full video series on how to grow weed on Leafly’s YouTube .

When buds are done drying and have been trimmed, the initial amount of moisture is out and it’s time to cure your weed.

For curing, you’ll be storing finished buds in containers—typically airtight glass jars—to stop the loss of moisture, and to preserve flavors and aromas. Curing usually takes two weeks to a month, and humidity inside curing containers needs to be between 55-65%.

Why curing cannabis is important

The curing process is possibly the most overlooked aspect of growing weed. During curing, moisture continues to draw from the center of the bud toward the outside.

Curing affects the flavor and quality of the smoke. Many terpenes, which give cannabis its unique smell and flavor, are quite sensitive and can degrade and evaporate at temperatures as low as 50°F. A slow cure at low temperatures will preserve terpenes better than a quick, hot dry.

A proper cure also allows you to store weed for long periods without worrying about mold or cannabinoid or terpene degradation. Well-cured flower can be stored in an airtight container in a cool, dark place for up to two years without significant loss of potency.

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Equipment and tools needed to cure cannabis

When curing cannabis, it should be done in a room or space that has a stable temperature and humidity—dank, wet basements or hot, muggy attics aren’t ideal. The space should maintain room temperature and not be too humid.

Light can also degrade terpenes, so it’s ideal to be able to turn off the lights in the space or be able to cover jars so light doesn’t leak in.

To cure buds, you will need:

  • Airtight jars
  • Hygrometer (for each jar) to measure temperature and humidity

Curing cannabis buds

Once buds are dry, it’s time to cure them.

Place the trimmed buds into some type of airtight container. Most people use wide-mouth quart or half-gallon glass mason jars, but you can also use ceramic, metal, or wood vessels.

Plastic bags are unsuitable for curing as they are not impervious to oxygen. Also, you don’t want your weed tasting like plastic.

Pack buds loosely in containers without compacting or crushing them. Seal containers and store in a cool, dry, dark place.

Within a day or two you’ll notice buds get a little softer as moisture from the middle of the buds rehydrates the outer parts. If this doesn’t happen, you have likely over-dried your cannabis.

Humidity inside sealed jars should be 55-65%. If you’re unsure, you can also buy a digital hygrometer—which measures moisture—available for $20 or so at any hardware store.

If buds are too dry, you can add a humidity pack, such as a Boveda pack, to rehydrate buds.

If buds are too wet, leave the lid off for half a day or a full day before resealing them. Be sure to check humidity levels every day and leave the lid off for a period of time if they still are too wet.

Burp your buds

During the first week of curing, regardless of humidity level, open the containers once or twice a day for a couple minutes—this is called burping. This releases moisture and replenishes oxygen inside the container.

If you notice an odor of ammonia when opening a container, it means the buds are not dry enough and anaerobic bacteria are consuming them, which will lead to moldy, rotten cannabis. Leave the lid off for a day and reseal tomorrow.

After the first week, burp containers only once every few days.

How long does it take to cure cannabis?

After two to four weeks in containers, your cannabis should be cured enough to give you a flavorful, aromatic, and quality experience. Some people prefer to cure for four to eight weeks, and some strains even benefit from six months or more of curing.

How to store your harvested cannabis buds

After curing cannabis, you can store buds for up to two years without much loss of potency. Like fine wine or a whiskey barrel, properly dried and cured cannabis is best when kept in a cool, dark place—mildew and other molds on cannabis and organic matter thrive in temperatures between 77-86°F.

Excessive heat can dry out cannabinoids and terpenes that have taken months to develop. When these essential oils get too dry along with plant material, it can result in a hot, harsh smoke.

Here are some tips for storing buds:

  • Store out of direct sunlight in a cool, dry place
  • Store in containers with a neutral charge, like glass mason jars
  • Use hygrometers or products like a Boveda pack to monitor and control humidity levels
  • Vacuum seal jars and containers to minimize oxygen exposure
  • Separate strains to maintain individual flavor profiles, and label with a date—it sucks to mix up strains

Temperature

Lower temperatures also slow decarboxylation, the process in which THCA converts into the intoxicating THC. THC eventually degrades into CBN, a cannabinoid with different effects and properties. Additionally, warm air holds more moisture than cold air.

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Humidity

Humidity control is paramount to keeping mildew and other mold contaminants out of your cannabis. Keep cannabis between 55-65% relative humidity when stored to maintain and enhance color, consistency, aroma, and flavor.

Light

Harmful UV rays break down many organic and synthetic materials, and UV rays will degrade cannabis over time. Storing cannabis out of direct light will also help control temperature.

Do you have to dry harvested Seeds?

Hello all I pollinated my blue mystic with some awesome indica bud I smoked had a few seeds from the smoke. Anyway I pollinated about 4 weeks ago and yesterday I took a peak and saw one seed just sitting there and another one about to pop out so I took these two letting one dry now and then I put the other into a wet paper towel. So my question here is do I have to dry seeds before planting? Or can I harvest them off the lady and put them right into germination? This is my first time breeding and I’m not really sure, couldn’t find the answer on the search as well.

Oh the seeds are dark and hard, they have
markings on them but not really distinct

How Long do Marijuana Seeds last?

When it comes to cannabis seeds, many first time growers tend to have some sitting around from an old friend or baggie. With recent legalization, new growers are deciding to dust their seeds off and start their very own grow, but how long do marijuana seeds last before they won’t germinate?

A typical feminized cannabis plant can produce an enormous amount of seeds – hundreds, depending on how well the plant takes the pollen and how meticulous the pollination process is. It also largely depends on the strain, as some strains are capable of producing much more, especially if their flowers are larger and can hold more. But how long do they last once they’ve been harvested and dried?

How Long do Marijuana Seeds Last?

There are many different factors that come into play when it comes to cannabis seed lifespan, and the most important is conservation. If you’ve obtained your seeds from a seed bank and they come in their own packaging, when it comes to storage you can simply leave them in their packaging in a dark, dry spot; seed banks usually recommend planting within the year.

However, if you’re planning on crossing your own plants and making your own seeds, you’ll need to know how to harvest, dry and store them if you’re planning on keeping them for a while before germinating them; knowing how to store cannabis seeds properly is quite an important tidbit of information if you’re a professional cannabis grower.

The seed is undoubtedly just as important as the final result; without quality seeds, you won’t get quality results. Keep in mind that cannabis seeds are practically living beings ready to be brought fully to life. Many new growers don’t know that cannabis seeds require specific care, and the way you store your seeds can significantly affect their outcome. Check out our Cannabis seeds – Buy Marijuana Seeds section to find reliable strains.

Drying Cannabis Seeds

When working from the start you’ll first need to pollinate the flowers on a female cannabis plant and then harvest the seeds once it’s fully matured. Once you have your seeds you’ll need to dry them out before they can be stored or even germinated – they should be ready to harvest once they’ve gone a dark brown color or start showing dark stripes. Most people opt to dry their seeds by simply drying the flowers and harvesting the seeds once they’ve dried out – it makes them much easier to remove from the flowers.

How Long do Marijuana Seeds Last in Storage?

Once you have your seeds you’re going to want to store them correctly if you plan on using them down the line. In fact, when stored under perfect conditions, you can germinate 5 year old cannabis seeds successfully. Some astonishing cases have been reported of seeds lasting up to 10 years when stored optimally, although the germination times may vary wildly, taking much longer than a fresh seed. For home-growers, storing and maintaining seeds is quite important, and even more so for seed banks; a badly stored seed may not germinate, and if it does it may not grow properly. There are various parameters you’ll need to follow in order to store seeds long-term.

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Seed Storage: Light

One of the first things to keep in mind is that whatever container that you store your seeds in needs to block out all light. If you’ve ever germinated cannabis seeds before, then you know that light is an important factor when it comes to the probability of the seed germinating or not. If your seeds are exposed to light for too long, they may end up too weak to germinate; even if they germinate they might have quite a hard time starting off.

Seed Storage: Temperature

The temperature at which you store your seeds is one of the most important factors. If you’re going for something short-term, you just have to make sure that they’re in an area with a stable temperature – do not store them somewhere where there are going to be temperature changes.

However, for long-term storage you’ll need to store them at around 6-8° – if you plan on storing a large amount of seeds, we recommend buying a small cooler for that specific purpose to keep them at a low, constant temperature; opening your fridge can cause temperature changes, so keeping them with the rest of your products is probably not the best idea.

Also, remember to use a blacked out container when storing in the fridge or a black bag to ensure that the lights inside don’t affect the seeds when opened.

Seed Storage: Humidity

Humidity is another incredibly important factor that can determine the success rate of your seeds. Relative humidity is essentially what causes seeds to germinate, so they’re quite delicate at this stage and you don’t want them accidentally germinating; keep relative humidity low in their container.

This obviously depends on your climate too, as there are places that have incredibly high humidity and others that are quite dry, which can directly impact how you have to store your seeds. As a general rule of thumb, we recommend keeping them in a low-humidity container, and if you live somewhere incredibly humid you might have to use specific methods to decrease humidity.

Cannabis seeds can germinate with a RH of 40-60%, and humidity higher than that can actually drown them and kill them. However, humidity ranging from 9 – 20% may also cause a myriad of issues such as insects, fungi, and even seed sweating due to excessive heat. The ideal humidity range in which to store your seeds is between 20 to 30% RH.

How Long do Marijuana Seeds Last

Taking into account the previously mentioned parameters, the best way to store your cannabis seeds for long periods of time is by vacuum sealing them and then putting them into an opaque container or bag so that no light gets to them. Keep them at a constant temperature of 6-8°. Some growers use products such as silica sachets to keep humidity down even if the outside temperature/humidity becomes drastically altered – this is a good idea if you live in more humid or hotter climates.

Keep in mind that if your seeds experience too much light or temperature changes they may end up using up their nutrient reserves, which would render them useless.