Seeds That Look Like Weed Seeds

as the title says I'm wondering what seeds you could mix a few cannabis seeds into. This is strictly for shipping purposes. Does anyone know of any other seeds that look similar to cannabis seeds? Help please Cannabis is one of the most unique plants when it comes to effects, flavour, and aroma. However, it shares a similar appearance with these other species.

Any seeds that resemble cannabis seeds?

as the title says I’m wondering what seeds you could mix a few cannabis seeds into. This is strictly for shipping purposes.

robert 14617
Well-Known Member
crazymanny00
Active Member
Scrotie Mcboogerballs
Well-Known Member
robert 14617
Well-Known Member
°GRO₩ILLA°
Member

Grape seeds.you knoe those slimy one that the skin slides off the grape.my dad called them snot grapes.and ya they look EXACTLY the same.hope helps my freinds

T macc
Well-Known Member

thank you all for the replies. I’ll definetly consider those. exept hemp seeds. that’s too perfect of a match lol.

T macc
Well-Known Member
lokie
Well-Known Member

if the folks on the other end can tell a difference enough to pick out
the real seeds then it stands that someone inspecting, if intercepted, will also know.

polyarcturus
Well-Known Member

if the folks on the other end can tell a difference enough to pick out
the real seeds then it stands that someone inspecting, if intercepted, will also know.

Amateur.Grower
Well-Known Member

Just ship it fedex and don’t worry. I’ve had some bud sent to me from cali years ago with no problems. Fedex overnight is where it’s at.

Jogro
Well-Known Member

I think if you’d compare them side by side, you wouldn’t think so.

I grow these all the time. Coriander (aka cilantro) seeds are super light in both weight and color, and have wrinkled surfaces. They also are used all by themselves as a spice and have a very distinctive smell.

They’re not a perfect match, but Okra seeds are probably a bit closer to SMALL cannabis seeds in terms of overall size, shape, and weight, though they are typically fairly dark in color, nearly black.

polyarcturus
Well-Known Member

I think if you’d compare them side by side, you wouldn’t think so.

I grow these all the time. Coriander (aka cilantro) seeds are super light in both weight and color, and have wrinkled surfaces. They also are used all by themselves as a spice and have a very distinctive smell.

They’re not a perfect match, but Okra seeds are probably a bit closer to SMALL cannabis seeds in terms of overall size, shape, and weight, though they are typically fairly dark in color, nearly black.

Seeds that look like Cannabis seeds?

Does anyone know of any other seeds that look similar to cannabis seeds?

djruiner
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GreatwhiteNorth
Global Moderator
TaoWolf
Active Member
undtecd420
Member
KuLong
Well-Known Member

I don’t know the answer but I am now curious what seeds are a perfect resemblance.

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Be nice to have some non-marijuana seeds laying around just in case someone is poking around.

PappaBear
New Member

Does anyone know of any other seeds that look similar to cannabis seeds?

Hemp seeds, they are for production use. Very cheap and are the real thing. Can be mailed to your doorstep and actually will grow flowers.
It would produce dirty mexican brown brown though.

I do not condone gettin folks, but if you do, send me 20% via the paypal. Haha

Mattdog
Member

its not to rip people off guys and gals. Its to disguise them jeesh. I am being honest hear, although there is no real way for you to realize that by me just typing it to you all.

PappaBear
New Member
Mattdog
Member

lol, thanks for the idea pappa bear but I dont need help in disguising the seeds in normal objects, I need help with disguising the seeds among other seeds. So once again does anyone know any seeds that resemble the appearance of mj seeds?

TaoWolf
Active Member

Sending you a PM (and to KuLong) – just keeping it on the down low since it’s good for discrete shipping.

kingajaffar
Member
DragonScaleZ
Member

Sending you a PM (and to KuLong) – just keeping it on the down low since it’s good for discrete shipping.

RoDDin
Well-Known Member

Hi, I’m from Malaysia. I’ve grown seeds which I’ve obtained from amsterdam but now my plants are out and would like to try n order from the U.S. any suggestions?

Christopher Declan
Member

Hi, I’m from Malaysia. I’ve grown seeds which I’ve obtained from amsterdam but now my plants are out and would like to try n order from the U.S. any suggestions?

Lizardking802
New Member

Lupin, brother. Lupin looks almost identical. I love both plants and it’s hard to tell the difference seed wise. I don’t know why people have to be so literal on here.

70’s natureboy
Well-Known Member

Lupin, brother. Lupin looks almost identical. I love both plants and it’s hard to tell the difference seed wise. I don’t know why people have to be so literal on here.

I have been wondering about that for years. The squirrels filled my car with pot seed look -alikes one year and I couldn’t figure out where they got so many. They must have been lupins. I planted some on my dogs grave but nothing grew.

xtsho
Well-Known Member

Lupinus, commonly known as lupin or lupine seeds while similar in appearance are easily identified as not being cannabis.

Plants That Look Similar to Cannabis

You might be surprised at how many plants look like cannabis. Sure, any experienced grower can tell them apart, but these species can serve as effective living camouflage against those with untrained eyes. Find out more about nine plants that look like marijuana, and their own unique traits.

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Cannabinoids, terpenes, phytochemicals, organic cultivation

Contents:

  1. Plants that look like marijuana
    1. Scarlet rosemallow (hibiscus coccineus)
    2. Southern marigold (tagetes minuta)
    3. Kenaf (hibiscus cannabinus)
    4. Japanese maple tree (acer palmatum)
    5. Coralbush (jatropha multifida)
    6. Spider flower (cleome spinosa)
    7. Cassava (manihot esculenta)
    8. Chinese chaste tree (vitex negundo)
    9. Japanese hop (humulus japonicus)

    Cannabis exists as a unique species within the plant kingdom. No other plant produces such an abundance of cannabinoids, and you’d be hard-pressed to find another species that smells quite as distinct. Furthermore, very few plants have had such a significant impact on human culture throughout history, in terms of use as an industrial crop, and for holistic and recreational purposes.

    9 Plants That Look Like Marijuana

    However, despite its many exclusive traits, cannabis does share aspects of its appearance with several other species. Cannabis definitely has a distinct look, but there are numerous plants that possess similar leaf structures or stems. The differences are obvious to the trained eye, but newcomers are more likely to be stumped. With this in mind, outdoor cannabis growers can use these plants to disguise their crop!

    But before you go ahead and fill your garden with cannabis-like species, consider that these plants likely won’t cover up the smell of terpenes from your weed. Also, neighbours might mistake them for actual cannabis plants and inform the authorities. If you think plants that look like cannabis can add value to your weed garden, then you should definitely check out the list below! Furthermore, these plants are simply fun to grow on their own, especially if you want to cultivate cannabis but your situation won’t allow it.

    Scarlet Rosemallow (Hibiscus coccineus)

    If you want to add the elegance of cannabis to your garden without the overwhelming aroma and risk of getting caught, scarlet rosemallow (also known as “Texas Star” hibiscus) provides an excellent option. This hardy species belongs to the Malvaceae family and grows throughout the coastal plain of the Southeastern United States, where it thrives in swamps, marshes, and ditches. Plants grow to lofty heights of 180–240cm, much taller than small indica and autoflowering species, but are large enough to pass off as towering sativa varieties.

    Scarlet rosemallow grows perennially. Although it dies back when the first frosts arrive, it bounces back to life in the spring. The species produces gorgeous five-petalled flowers that attract key pollinators such as hummingbirds, butterflies, and bees. Blossoms aside, the plant also features large (12–15cm-wide) leaves that look very cannabis-like in appearance, thanks to their long, distinct leaflets.

    Despite sharing some visual characteristics with cannabis, scarlet rosemallow exhibits some key differences that make the two plants easy to tell apart for those with experience. First of all, most cannabis leaves feature 7–9 leaflets, whereas hibiscus rosemallow leaves feature 5 (3 large and 2 small). Some varieties of the species also feature very small and slender leaves that don’t share much of a resemblance to cannabis, and others possess deep red stems that are a glaring giveaway.

    If this plant has a place in your garden, you need to know a couple of key growing points. Scarlet rosemallow loves wet feet (it did evolve in a marsh, after all), so you need to keep the roots moist at all times, especially during hot summers. Although the above-ground parts die back during the winter, the root system survives. Add a thick layer of mulch in the autumn to insulate the ground and retain moisture.

    Southern Marigold (Tagetes minuta)

    Southern marigold doesn’t look very similar to cannabis up close, but you could easily mistake this member of the Asteraceae family for a lanky sativa cultivar from a distance. Also known as wild marigold and black mint, this half-hardy annual is native to the southern half of South America. However, following the arrival of the Spanish to the region, the plant made its way all around the world, from North America and Europe to Africa.

    In the Andes, the herb goes by the name Wacatay or Huacatay. Traditionally, the people in this region used southern marigold as a culinary herb, and you’ll frequently find it in local grocery stores in the form of a bottled paste. However, not everyone can tolerate this plant, and it causes rashes and photodermatitis in some consumers.

    So, how exactly does it compare to cannabis? From several metres away, the long and narrow stems and pointy leaves give plants the appearance of untopped sativa varieties. However, get a little closer and you’ll come across some very obvious differences; the leaves give the game away. Whereas the leaflets on cannabis leaves all protrude from the same leaf, southern marigold leaflets are actually small individual leaves connected to the stem. This species also starts to flower in October and produces tiny white flowers—much different to the bulbous buds of cannabis plants.

    If you want to grow southern marigold, sow seeds indoors as early as February, or outdoors during May. Germination takes place over the course of two weeks. Once your plants become big enough to handle, transplant them into regular garden soil and position them in an area that receives full sun.

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